We are sorry but we are currently not accepting any more orders online. Please contact us at contact@ultra26sports.com for questions or comments.
We greatly appreciate your interest and your support, and we wish you the very best in your training and competition! #FeedYourStrong!
We are sorry but we are currently not accepting any more orders online. Please contact us at contact@ultra26sports.com for questions or comments. We greatly appreciate your interest and your support, and we wish you the very best in your training and competition! #FeedYourStrong!
Satisfaction Guaranteed Badge
Protein

Protein

There is no more effective buzzword from a marketing standpoint than to boast how much protein your product contains. Because the more protein you take, the bigger and stronger your muscles get, right? Again, WRONG!

Endurance athletes certainly have higher protein needs than sedentary individuals. But assuming you maintain a reasonable daily diet, you should still receive more than enough protein to meet your energy and muscle building needs, and special supplementation should not be necessary (1, 2, 3). You will just be making expensive urine.

For moderate-intensity endurance athletes, a total daily dose of 1.2-1.4 grams per kilogram per day (approximately 80-100 grams per day for someone weighing 70 kilograms or 150 pounds) should be sufficient based on current research (1, 2, 3, 4). This is assuming, of course, adequate energy intake in your daily diet. But even among elite athletes, research has shown that the needs do not go beyond 1.6 grams per kilogram per day (3, 4). A typical endurance athlete’s diet contains approximately 1.8 grams per kilogram per day for males and 1.2 grams per kilogram per day for females (2). In other words, as long as you are taking in a reasonable diet, you should be fine as far as protein intake goes.

Does that mean there is no role at all for additional supplementation? Not so fast. Branched chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine and valine), or BCAAs, have been shown to reduce central fatigue during endurance competition (5, 17). Central fatigue, as opposed to peripheral fatigue, is that sense of exhaustion you feel in your mind as competition wears on, despite your muscles feeling like they can still give much more.

The mechanisms behind central fatigue are still relatively unknown. But research has suggested that increased levels of serotonin in the brain are at least partly responsible (5, 8, 9, 10, 15, 18). Serotonin is produced in the brain from the amino acid tryptophan, and, during endurance exercise, free tryptophan (i.e. not protein bound) is transported into the brain at an increased rate (5, 11, 14). Therefore, decreasing the amount of free tryptophan entering the brain should delay the central fatigue during endurance competition.

One approach to this is to increase the amount of BCAAs in the bloodstream, because they compete with free tryptophan for transport into the brain. And research has demonstrated that with BCAA administration, less tryptophan enters the brain and central fatigue is reduced (5, 14). Although whether this is due to less serotonin (5) or fewer other tryptophan metabolites (14) being produced remains controversial.

The catch is that with increasing BCAA supplementation, more ammonia is likely to be produced (12, 15, 16, 17). And ammonia is, like serotonin, also a mediator of fatigue (13, 15). So with BCAAs and endurance exercise, there has to be a balance between having enough BCAAs to be beneficial (5, 7, 14, 17), but not having too much to generate excessive ammonia (12, 16).

Ultra 26™ products are designed with this research in mind, to contain the optimal blend of protein to decrease central fatigue during endurance exercise, and then enhance recovery when you finish.

Remember, it’s not “the more protein, the better”. Its the right protein at the right dose at the right time that counts. Use Ultra 26™ and let science, not buzzphrases, guide your supplementation!

References:
1. Lemon PW. “Beyond the zone: Protein needs of active individuals”. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, Vol. 19, No. 5, 513S–521S (2000)
2. Tarnopolsky M. “Protein Requirements for Endurance Athletes.” Nutrition 2004;20:662–668
3. Meredith CN, Zackin MJ, Frontera WR, Evans WJ. Dietary protein requirements and body protein metabolism in endurance trained men. J Appl Physiol. 1989;66(6) 2850-6.
4. Campbell B, Kreider R, Ziegenfuss T, et al. “International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: Protein and Exercise.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition 2007, 4:8
5. Blomstrand E: A role for branched-chain amino acids in reducing central fatigue. J Nutr 2006, 136(2):544S-547S.
6. Tarnopolsky MA, Bosman M, Macdonald JR, et al. “Postexercise protein-carbohydrate supplements increase muscle glycogen in men and women. J. Appl. Physiol. 83(6): 1877– 1883, 1997.
7. Blomstrand E, Saltin B. BCAA intake affects protein metabolism in muscle after but not during exercise in humans. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 2001 Aug;281(2):E365-74.
8. Newsholme EA, Blomstrand E. Branched-chain amino acids and central fatigue. J Nutr. 2006 Jan;136(1 Suppl):274S-6S.
9. Yamamoto T, Azechi H, Board M. Essential role of excessive tryptophan and its neurometabolites in fatigue. Can J Neurol Sci. 2012 Jan;39(1):40-7.
10. Blomstrand E. Amino acids and central fatigue. Amino Acids. 2001;20(1):25-34.
11. Nybo L, Nielsen B, Blomstrand E, Moller K, Secher N. Neurohumoral responses during prolonged exercise in humans. J Appl Physiol (1985). 2003 Sep;95(3):1125-31.
12. Watson P, Shirreffs SM, Maughan RJ. The effect of acute branched-chain amino acid supplementation on prolonged exercise capacity in a warm environment. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2004 Dec;93(3):306-14.
13. Mutch BJ, Banister EW. Ammonia metabolism in exercise and fatigue: a review. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 1983;15(1):41-50.
14. Yamamoto T, Azechi H, Board M. Essential role of excessive tryptophan and its neurometabolites in fatigue. Can J Neurol Sci. 2012 Jan;39(1):40-7.
15. Meeusen R, Watson P, Hasegawa H, Roelands B, Piacentini MF. Central fatigue: the serotonin hypothesis and beyond. Sports Med. 2006;36(10):881-909.
16. van Hall G, Raaymakers J S, Saris W H, and Wagenmakers A J. Ingestion of branched-chain amino acids and tryptophan during sustained exercise in man: failure to affect performance. J Physiol. 1995 Aug 1; 486(Pt 3): 789–794.
17. Mittleman KD, Ricci MR, Bailey SP (1998) Branched-chain amino acids prolong exercise during heat stress in men and women. Med Sci Sports Exerc 30:83–91
18. Claghorn GC, Fonseca IA, Thompson Z, Barber C, Garland T Jr. Serotonin-mediated central fatigue underlies increased endurance capacity in mice from lines selectively bred for high voluntary wheel running. Physiol Behav. 2016 Jul 1;161:145-54.